A change might be as good as a rest but why not have both?

A summer holiday for many is an opportunity to leave the day to day behind, have fun with your family or partner and recharge.  Having the “headspace” to think about your job and where you are heading often only really happens when you have a break, so we find the volume of new applicants increases in early September as people take the decision to see what else is out there.

So, what should you be thinking about when evaluating whether it’s time for a move?  When applying for new roles our candidates rate the following six issues as the most important:

  1. The work itself
  2. The team you work in
  3. Gaining new skills and knowledge
  4. Opportunity for promotion
  5. The money
  6. The culture of the business

When considering whether to stay in your current role they make an equally good list.

1. The work itself – is it challenging and stimulating?  Do you get enough interaction with others and is it mainly office based / remote working / travelling and does that really suit you?

2. The team you work with – are there others to learn off. Is the team supportive and fun? Are people genuinely interested in you and your well-being (particularly your boss) and are they people that you are comfortable socialising with as well as working with?

3. Gaining new skills and experience – we all want to feel we are progressing and growing our knowledge and capability.  Try to list the new things you have learned in the last 6 or 12 months?  Have you learned all you are going to learn in your current role?

4. Opportunity for promotion – promotion isn’t for everyone, so it’s important to be honest with yourself. If you love being a no. 2 then don’t think that you need to push to be a no. 1. If, however you want to take on more – especially people management then evaluating whether you have a clear route to promotion, and knowing what you have to do and in what time frame to get there is a good consideration.

5. The money – how much is enough?  If you feel that you are underpaid this can be a very negative thought if not raised and addressed. It’s a fact that people who move more regularly (perhaps every 2-3 years) tend to do better at progressing remuneration than those who stay longer.

6. The culture of the business – culture is created via behaviours and it tends to be most influenced by the most senior members of your business. If you find yourself questioning behaviours you observe and experience then perhaps culturally you aren’t the best fit for where you are working. We meet many clients in greater London, who run businesses with amazing cultures, both in the commercial sector and in the not for profit sector (charity and arts).  There is no need to stick with a culture you are starting to lose respect for.

We spend a big part of our lives at work, so rather than just loving Mondays, if you want to consider a move talk with Trace and love Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesday, Thursdays and Fridays!

 

www.tracerecruit.com